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Background: Facebook Insights Definitions For Facebook Posts

August 20, 2012
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Sometimes it’s amazing what a Google search won’t yield. With all the changes going on on Facebook, it’s important to understand the definitions of the metrics they provide. Below are the definitions of the metrics provided when you export data from Facebook Insights at the Facebook post level:

Total Reach: Total FB Users who saw and/or interacted with this post.

Organic Reach: Total # of  FB Users who saw and/or interacted with this post because they were fans

Paid Reach: Total # of FB users who saw and/or interacted with this post from an ad/sponsored story/sponsored post.

Viral Reach: Total # of FB Users who saw and/or interacted with this post because their friends interacted with the post

Total Impressions: Total # of times the post was displayed to users

Organic Impressions: # of times the post was displayed to users who were fans

Paid Impressions: # of times the post was displayed to users as an ad, sponsored story or sponsored post.

Viral Impressions: # of times the post was displayed to users who saw and/or interacted with this post because their friends interacted with the post

Engaged Users:  Engaged Users is the number of people who have clicked anywhere on your post.

Talking About The Post: People Talking About This is the number of people who have created a story from your post. Stories include: Sharing, liking, or commenting on your post

Stories About The Post: Number of stories created about the post

Post Consumers: Total # of people who clicked on and viewed the photo.

Post Consumption: Total # of times the photo/link in the post was clicked on and viewed.

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Update: New-ish Option Changes Google Match Types

July 30, 2012
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Over the last few months, Google has released a new feature that affects the way keyword match types (and therefore the strategy of using match types to organize a campaign) works.

In the setting option under each campaign, users can now find a drop down for “Keyword matching options.” When selected, the following option appears:

If you remember, the following had previously held true for the phrase and exact match types on Google:

1. Plurals were considered separate keywords and needed to be listed as such. Before, if “shoe” was in a campaign, but not “shoes,” then a search for “shoes” would not yield the ad.

2. The only way for an ad to show for a misspelled keyword was to run on broad match or broad match modifier. Ads on the phrase match keyword “shoe” would not show up for “sheo”.

3. If an advertiser wanted to show for close variations of a keyword (i.e. heels instead of shoes or pony instead of horse), the advertiser had to advertise the word on broad match or broad match modifier.

Now, however, if the selected box is checked (as is now the default), the above no longer applies to phrase or exact match.

What It Means (In My Humble Opinion)

Having the box checked is better for Google because it enables them to show ads for more search queries. Since advertisers only pay on a pay per click basis, Google makes money the more competitive a pay per click auction is.

From an advertiser’s perspective, the change is better and worse. While it makes it less likely that an advertiser won’t show up on a crucial keyword, it also serves to help eliminate query control. It used to be that if an advertiser wanted to advertise on a very specific keyword, an advertiser could put all their budget into that specific keyword (by putting the keyword in its own campaign and placing the keyword on exact match). With the box checked, this would no longer be the case, as exact match essentially would be the same as broad match modifier used to be.

For those traditionalists, I recommend not checking the box. If an advertiser wants to be absolutely sure they show up on everything, checking the box might be ok, but be sure to keep an eye on search query reports to make sure that the queries remain as targeted and relevant as desired.

 

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Lesson #19: Never Put More Than One Keyword Type In the Same Ad Group or Campaign

June 13, 2012
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Earlier this week, we discussed the four different types of keywords: brand, non-brand/generic, competitive and long-tail. Since long-tail keywords can fall under any of the other three categories though, for today’s discussion, we will only refer to the three main keyword types: brand, non-brand/generic and competitive.

When it comes to these types of keywords, never put more than one keyword type in the same ad group as each other, or even the same campaign. Each keyword type demands a different keyword strategy, bidding strategy, and, most likely, a budget. In addition, each keyword type will perform differently from one another – by separating them into their own campaigns, the best performing keywords will benefit while the worst performing keywords will have the least effect.

To explain in greater detail: Brand keywords generally have the best performance and the highest quality score, as they are most directly relevant to the content on the site and the place a user searching for a brand term is most likely to click. As a result, they have low CPCs, high CTRs, and lead to great account history. All the benefits of their strong performance serve to lower the CPCs of all the keywords and ads in their campaign.

Competitive or conquesting keywords tend to perform the least well. The opposite of brand terms, they are the least relevant to a site’s content, and searchers are least likely to click on them. Consequently, their low quality score and poor performance history can (and will) hurt whichever campaign and account contains them.

So mitigate the damage by putting competitive keywords and brand keywords in separate campaigns from one another. The strong performance of the brand keywords will continue to help them, driving the CPC down further, while not being tainted by the poor performance of the competitive keywords.

Generic or Non-Brand keywords are generally more expensive than brand terms. They are more plentiful and competition on the terms is greater. In addition, the budget for non-brand keywords may be different from the budget for brand keywords. Given all of the above, it is again best to separate the generic keywords into their own campaigns.

 

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