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generic keywords

Lesson #24: Bidding on Generic Keywords

June 25, 2012
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When bidding on generic keywords, the most important thing is not to get too carried away. What do I mean by this? Advertisers who make mistakes bidding on generic keywords tend to fall prey to one of three possibilities:

1) Bidding Too Much on a Generic Keyword: Just don’t do it. Make sure you are keeping an eye on the ROI of the term to your company, and do not let the bids become over-inflated accordingly. For example, with bid rules, especially position based bid rules, it is very easy for an advertiser to inadvertantly wind up increasing their bid significantly, even when there is no competition. For more information, please see Bid Rules Are Not Set It And Forget It.

2) Bidding Too Little on a Generic Keyword: Generic keywords are often competitive terms. Depending on the industry, they can be extremely competitive terms. As a result, it’s important to make sure that, while not overinflated, the bid on the keyword is in fact realistic so that ads do show up for the keyword. For example, the keyword “mesothelioma” regularly wins as the most expensive keyword within adwords. The average CPC for “mesothelioma” is generally around $100. As a result, an advertiser bidding $20 will not show up. “Mesothelioma” is an outlier in terms of how much it costs, but the same is true of nearly all generic keywords; if there is a lot of keyword volume for a word, and the advertiser’s bid is under $1, be sure to check impression share and position. It is likely that the advertiser needs to increase their bid to receive the maximum benefit from showing on the keyword.

3. Bidding on Irrelevant Keywords: When picking generic keywords to bid on, there are a lot of possibilities. However, it is important not to disregard the search query report when evaluating keyword performance. If the keyword is not leading to relevant traffic or not performing well, don’t get carried away bidding on it. Focus on keywords that perform the best and yield the most relevant traffic – doing so will improve both account and site performance, while reducing cost per acquisition.

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Lesson #19: Never Put More Than One Keyword Type In the Same Ad Group or Campaign

June 13, 2012
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Earlier this week, we discussed the four different types of keywords: brand, non-brand/generic, competitive and long-tail. Since long-tail keywords can fall under any of the other three categories though, for today’s discussion, we will only refer to the three main keyword types: brand, non-brand/generic and competitive.

When it comes to these types of keywords, never put more than one keyword type in the same ad group as each other, or even the same campaign. Each keyword type demands a different keyword strategy, bidding strategy, and, most likely, a budget. In addition, each keyword type will perform differently from one another – by separating them into their own campaigns, the best performing keywords will benefit while the worst performing keywords will have the least effect.

To explain in greater detail: Brand keywords generally have the best performance and the highest quality score, as they are most directly relevant to the content on the site and the place a user searching for a brand term is most likely to click. As a result, they have low CPCs, high CTRs, and lead to great account history. All the benefits of their strong performance serve to lower the CPCs of all the keywords and ads in their campaign.

Competitive or conquesting keywords tend to perform the least well. The opposite of brand terms, they are the least relevant to a site’s content, and searchers are least likely to click on them. Consequently, their low quality score and poor performance history can (and will) hurt whichever campaign and account contains them.

So mitigate the damage by putting competitive keywords and brand keywords in separate campaigns from one another. The strong performance of the brand keywords will continue to help them, driving the CPC down further, while not being tainted by the poor performance of the competitive keywords.

Generic or Non-Brand keywords are generally more expensive than brand terms. They are more plentiful and competition on the terms is greater. In addition, the budget for non-brand keywords may be different from the budget for brand keywords. Given all of the above, it is again best to separate the generic keywords into their own campaigns.

 

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Background: The Four Different Types of Keywords

June 11, 2012
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Not only are there a variety of keyword match types, but there are also different types or categories of keywords that are commonly used to help classify the different keywords within an account. Understanding the four different types of keywords will make it much easier to understand and plan the strategy for an account.

The different types of keywords, their definitions, and examples are as follows:

Brand Keywords – Brand keywords are keywords that contain the advertisers brand name (or brand terms, such as a slogan or trademark).

ex. Digital4startups

Non-Brand or Generic Keywords – Non-Brand keywords, also known as Generic keywords, do not contain the company’s brand term in them, nor do they contain the brand name of any other companies. These are generally the higher volume keywords.

ex. Digital marketing, search marketing, learn digital marketing

Conquesting Keywords – Conquesting keywords are keywords that contain a competitors name, product number/model, slogan, or anything else that would be immediately identified as being a competitor’s. More information on conquesting keywords.

ex. Search Engine Land, Google Adwords

Long-Tail Keywords – Long-Tail keywords are keywords containing 3 or more words that are lower volume terms. However, if a user were to search for one of these queries, the content being provided would likely be relevant to them. Long-tail keywords can include keywords for a specific article, media mention, or product. Long-tail keywords can overlap with any of the other keyword types.

ex. different types of keywords, adwords keyword match types, how to learn digital marketing best practices

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